About the Hirshhorn

The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden is the Smithsonian Institution's museum of modern and contemporary art.

The Hirshhorn is located on the National Mall at the corner of 7th Street and Independence Avenue SW in Washington DC.

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Friday, April 25, 2014 12:30 pmGoogle Hangouts On Air
Formative to the development of the Hirshhorn’s exhibition “Damage Control: Art and Destruction Since 1950” is the work of artist Gustav Metzger. Metzger, who escaped the Holocaust as a child in 1939 by fleeing to England, has influenced generations of artists with his concept of Auto-Destructive art, the direct use of destruction in art as a response to the self-destructive tendencies and policies of society. 
On April 25 at 12:30 p.m. (EDT) join the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden and the Google Art Project for a rare opportunity to hear directly from Gustav Metzger, who will be in conversation with the co-curator of the “Damage Control” exhibition and the Hirshhorn’s Interim Director and Chief Curator Kerry Brougher and Andrew Wilson, Curator of Modern & Contemporary British Art, and Archives at +Tate. Send us your questions during the live broadcast!#arttalks #MetzgerArtTalk  
Metzger was also co-organizer of the 1966 Destruction in Art Symposium (DIAS) in London, a month-long event that brought together artists from around the world who were engaging in destructive activities. Metzger’s work and the invocation of destruction in art remain as relevant and important as they were more than fifty years ago when he wrote the first Auto-Destructive Art manifesto. 
Gustav Metzger creating an auto-destructive “painting” during his “South Bank Demonstration,” July 3, 1961. Photo: Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images.

Friday, April 25, 2014
12:30 pm
Google Hangouts On Air

Formative to the development of the Hirshhorn’s exhibition “Damage Control: Art and Destruction Since 1950” is the work of artist Gustav Metzger. Metzger, who escaped the Holocaust as a child in 1939 by fleeing to England, has influenced generations of artists with his concept of Auto-Destructive art, the direct use of destruction in art as a response to the self-destructive tendencies and policies of society. 

On April 25 at 12:30 p.m. (EDT) join the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden and the Google Art Project for a rare opportunity to hear directly from Gustav Metzger, who will be in conversation with the co-curator of the “Damage Control” exhibition and the Hirshhorn’s Interim Director and Chief Curator Kerry Brougher and Andrew Wilson, Curator of Modern & Contemporary British Art, and Archives at +Tate. Send us your questions during the live broadcast!
#arttalks #MetzgerArtTalk  

Metzger was also co-organizer of the 1966 Destruction in Art Symposium (DIAS) in London, a month-long event that brought together artists from around the world who were engaging in destructive activities. Metzger’s work and the invocation of destruction in art remain as relevant and important as they were more than fifty years ago when he wrote the first Auto-Destructive Art manifesto. 

Gustav Metzger creating an auto-destructive “painting” during his “South Bank Demonstration,” July 3, 1961. Photo: Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images.

Posted on Friday, April 18th 2014

Tags smithsonian hirshhorn gustav metzger MetzgerArtTalk arttalk damage control google art project

Vote for the Most Epic Disaster Movie of All Time: www.hirshhorn.si.edu/DISASTERTHON
ABOUT THE VOTING At hirshhorn.si.edu/DISASTERTHON, disaster movie fans can vote for the Most Epic Disaster Movie of All Time. Twenty-five titles are suggested, but disagreement is encouraged. Will the absurd comedy of Stanley Kubrick’s anti-war masterpiece “Dr. Strangelove” (1964) trump the ominous rumblings of the Sensurround-pioneering “Earthquake” (1974)? Can the relentlessly morphing villain of James Cameron’s “Terminator 2: Judgment Day” (1991) best the airborne terror that is “Sharknado” (2013)? Or will a dark horse emerge from a pack of write-ins? Find out when the winning film hits the screen at 10 p.m., closing out the marathon with a bang.
ABOUT THE CONTESTS Three separate contests reward finely honed rhetoric, wacky millinery and butt-numbing endurance:
First-, second- and third-place prizes will be awarded for Civil Defense, in which online voters craft persuasive defenses of their film faves. This is the only contest in which participants need not be present to win. Disaster fans who live in fortified bunkers 300 feet underground can vote online and follow DISASTERTHON! on Twitter to find out if they’ve won.
Hat-astrophe celebrates the creativity of gold-, silver- and bronze-medal crafters of disaster-themed hats. No flammables, liquids or hazmats are allowed in the museum—just good fun and a chance to outshine your rivals at the evening vernissage!

Viewers who come for the first film will receive a Passport to Disaster. At the end of each movie, a specially designed rubber stamp (biohazard symbol, radioactivity warning symbol, etc.) will confirm attendance. Those who grind all the way through to the bitter end will receive not only a fully stamped Passport to testify to their stick-to-itiveness but other fabulous prizes!
Admission is free, and seating will be first-come, first-served. Films may include adult content.

Vote for the Most Epic Disaster Movie of All Time: www.hirshhorn.si.edu/DISASTERTHON

ABOUT THE VOTING
At hirshhorn.si.edu/DISASTERTHON, disaster movie fans can vote for the Most Epic Disaster Movie of All Time. Twenty-five titles are suggested, but disagreement is encouraged. Will the absurd comedy of Stanley Kubrick’s anti-war masterpiece “Dr. Strangelove” (1964) trump the ominous rumblings of the Sensurround-pioneering “Earthquake” (1974)? Can the relentlessly morphing villain of James Cameron’s “Terminator 2: Judgment Day” (1991) best the airborne terror that is “Sharknado” (2013)? Or will a dark horse emerge from a pack of write-ins? Find out when the winning film hits the screen at 10 p.m., closing out the marathon with a bang.

ABOUT THE CONTESTS
Three separate contests reward finely honed rhetoric, wacky millinery and butt-numbing endurance:

First-, second- and third-place prizes will be awarded for Civil Defense, in which online voters craft persuasive defenses of their film faves. This is the only contest in which participants need not be present to win. Disaster fans who live in fortified bunkers 300 feet underground can vote online and follow DISASTERTHON! on Twitter to find out if they’ve won.

Hat-astrophe celebrates the creativity of gold-, silver- and bronze-medal crafters of disaster-themed hats. No flammables, liquids or hazmats are allowed in the museum—just good fun and a chance to outshine your rivals at the evening vernissage!

Viewers who come for the first film will receive a Passport to Disaster. At the end of each movie, a specially designed rubber stamp (biohazard symbol, radioactivity warning symbol, etc.) will confirm attendance. Those who grind all the way through to the bitter end will receive not only a fully stamped Passport to testify to their stick-to-itiveness but other fabulous prizes!

Admission is free, and seating will be first-come, first-served. Films may include adult content.

Posted on Wednesday, April 16th 2014

Tags smithsonian hirshhorn museum disasterthon

Saturday, April 26, 2014 Noon to midnight Ring Auditorium
CAST YOUR VOTE NOW
In celebration of the last weeks of Damage Control: Art and Destruction Since 1950, disaster epics will be featured throughout the day and evening, culminating in a crowdsourced favorite determined by SurveyMonkey polling. Watch the best (and sometimes worst) B-movies ever to dish up catastrophe on a cinematic scale. There will be a number of contests, with prizes awarded from the Ring stage. Take home top honors for the best homemade, disaster-inspired hat or the most artfully composed justification for a flick’s inclusion in the pantheon of disaster film. Marathoners who watch all six flicks will receive a special prize for endurance. This is one event where no one will tell you to put away your phone—join us as we live-tweet throughout the day.
Admission is free, and seating will be first-come, first-served. Films may include adult content.
About the Voting At hirshhorn.si.edu/DISASTERTHON, disaster movie fans can vote for the Most Epic Disaster Movie of All Time. Twenty-five titles are suggested, but disagreement is encouraged. Will the absurd comedy of Stanley Kubrick’s anti-war masterpiece “Dr. Strangelove” (1964) trump the ominous rumblings of the Sensurround-pioneering “Earthquake” (1974)? Can the relentlessly morphing villain of James Cameron’s “Terminator 2: Judgment Day” (1991) best the airborne terror that is “Sharknado” (2013)? Or will a dark horse emerge from a pack of write-ins? Find out when the winning film hits the screen at 10 p.m., closing out the marathon with a bang.
About the Contests Three separate contests reward finely honed rhetoric, wacky millinery and butt-numbing endurance:
First-, second- and third-place prizes will be awarded for Civil Defense, in which online voters craft persuasive defenses of their film faves. This is the only contest in which participants need not be present to win. Disaster fans who live in fortified bunkers 300 feet underground can vote online and follow DISASTERTHON! on Twitter to find out if they’ve won.
Hat-astrophe celebrates the creativity of gold-, silver- and bronze-medal crafters of disaster-themed hats. No flammables, liquids or hazmats are allowed in the museum—just good fun and a chance to outshine your rivals at the evening vernissage!

Viewers who come for the first film will receive a Passport to Disaster. At the end of each movie, a specially designed rubber stamp (biohazard symbol, radioactivity warning symbol, etc.) will confirm attendance. Those who grind all the way through to the bitter end will receive not only a fully stamped Passport to testify to their stick-to-itiveness but other fabulous prizes!

Saturday, April 26, 2014
Noon to midnight
Ring Auditorium

CAST YOUR VOTE NOW

In celebration of the last weeks of Damage Control: Art and Destruction Since 1950, disaster epics will be featured throughout the day and evening, culminating in a crowdsourced favorite determined by SurveyMonkey polling. Watch the best (and sometimes worst) B-movies ever to dish up catastrophe on a cinematic scale. There will be a number of contests, with prizes awarded from the Ring stage. Take home top honors for the best homemade, disaster-inspired hat or the most artfully composed justification for a flick’s inclusion in the pantheon of disaster film. Marathoners who watch all six flicks will receive a special prize for endurance. This is one event where no one will tell you to put away your phone—join us as we live-tweet throughout the day.

Admission is free, and seating will be first-come, first-served. Films may include adult content.

About the Voting
At hirshhorn.si.edu/DISASTERTHON, disaster movie fans can vote for the Most Epic Disaster Movie of All Time. Twenty-five titles are suggested, but disagreement is encouraged. Will the absurd comedy of Stanley Kubrick’s anti-war masterpiece “Dr. Strangelove” (1964) trump the ominous rumblings of the Sensurround-pioneering “Earthquake” (1974)? Can the relentlessly morphing villain of James Cameron’s “Terminator 2: Judgment Day” (1991) best the airborne terror that is “Sharknado” (2013)? Or will a dark horse emerge from a pack of write-ins? Find out when the winning film hits the screen at 10 p.m., closing out the marathon with a bang.

About the Contests
Three separate contests reward finely honed rhetoric, wacky millinery and butt-numbing endurance:

First-, second- and third-place prizes will be awarded for Civil Defense, in which online voters craft persuasive defenses of their film faves. This is the only contest in which participants need not be present to win. Disaster fans who live in fortified bunkers 300 feet underground can vote online and follow DISASTERTHON! on Twitter to find out if they’ve won.

Hat-astrophe celebrates the creativity of gold-, silver- and bronze-medal crafters of disaster-themed hats. No flammables, liquids or hazmats are allowed in the museum—just good fun and a chance to outshine your rivals at the evening vernissage!

Viewers who come for the first film will receive a Passport to Disaster. At the end of each movie, a specially designed rubber stamp (biohazard symbol, radioactivity warning symbol, etc.) will confirm attendance. Those who grind all the way through to the bitter end will receive not only a fully stamped Passport to testify to their stick-to-itiveness but other fabulous prizes!

Posted on Tuesday, April 15th 2014

Tags smithsonian hirshhorn disasterthon damage control

Assistant curator Mika Yoshitake gives a tour of “Gravity’s Edge,” an exhibition of paintings, sculptures, and works on paper from the Hirshhorn’s collection.

Posted on Thursday, April 10th 2014

“Jeremy Deller is frequently described as one of the most important artists of his generation—and his work, which he calls ‘social surrealism,’ is thought to have broadened the definition of contemporary art.” The Financial Times 

Winner of the 2004 Turner Prize, Deller is known for elaborate artworks that tap into social issues and involve the participation of numerous people. The Battle of Orgreave, 2001, a reenactment of a 1984 conflict between police and striking miners, was included in the 2008 Hirshhorn exhibition The Cinema Effect. Deller’s current Directions exhibition features English Magic, the video work that anchored the solo exhibition of the same title in the British Pavilion at the 2013 Venice Biennale.

As an art history undergraduate at the Courtauld Institute of Art, Deller met Andy Warhol and was invited to visit New York. During the two weeks he spent at the Factory, Deller realized that he wanted to be an artist himself: “You could make art out of whatever you were interested in—you could run a magazine, make film, TV, prints, paintings, music production…”

Deller has done virtually all of these things—and many more. He will be speaking about the ideas that concern him, the people he has met, and the many diverse paths his work has followed.

This event is co-sponsored by the British Council and American University’s Studio Art Program.

Posted on Wednesday, April 2nd 2014

Tags smithsonian hirshhorn meet the artist Jeremy Deller

CURATORS IN CONVERSATION

RE-VIEWING CONTEXTS FOR FOLK AND OUTSIDER ART
The Curators in Conversation series concentrates on creativity—what inspires curiosity, motivates imagination, and produces meaning. This platform for curators to speak about timely topics will be launched by internationally known curator Lynne Cooke, the Andrew W. Mellon Professor at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art. She will be moderating a discussion addressing the “discovery,” presentation, and contextualization of various forms of folk and outsider art, both currently and historically. She will be joined by art historian John Beardsley, Director of Garden and Landscape Studies at Dumbarton Oaks; Massimiliano Gioni, Director of the 2013 Venice Biennale and Associate Director and Director of Exhibitions at the New Museum; and Thomas J. Lax, Assistant Curator at the Studio Museum in Harlem. 

Left to right: Lynne Cooke (Photo: Timothy Greenfield-Sanders), John Beardsley, Massimiliano Gioni (detail, Photo: Marco De Scalzi. Courtesy Fondazione Nicola Trussardi, Milan), and Thomas J. Lax (Photo: Paul Mpagi Sepuya).

Posted on Monday, February 24th 2014

Tags Smithsonian Hirshhorn In Conversation lynne cooke john beardsley massimiliano gioni thomas j. lax

 Source hirshhorn.si.edu

Capturing the Contemporary: Raphael Montañez Ortiz
The full series of Raphael Montañez Ortiz’s interview can be viewed on the Hirshhorn’s YouTube Channel

Capturing the Contemporary is a collaborative initiative among Hirshhorn conservators, curators, educators, and other staff to engage in a series of dialogues with artists about their works in the collection. Portions of these video interviews will be made available through the website as a lasting and ever-expanding resource for conservators, scholars, and the general public.

The Hirshhorn Artist Interview Program recorded at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden on October 25, 2013.

Interviewers: Steven O’Banion, Conservation Fellow and Mika Yoshitake, Curator

Posted on Monday, February 10th 2014

Tags smithsonian Hirshhorn Museum raphael montañez ortiz Capturing the Contemporary artist interview program

February 14 to May 18, 2014The opening credits for the popular TV series Homeland include a montage of presidential clips, among them a close-up of President Barack Obama. At first he is shown upside down, speaking the words, “We must—” The image is quickly righted and he continues, “and we will—remain vigilant at home and abroad.” The show, while fictional, poses real questions about the powers and politics of  leadership, both seen and unseen.
More information on Black Box: Santiago Sierra and Jorge Galindo can be found at hirshhorn.si.edu.
Top: Still from Santiago Sierra and Jorge Galindo’s “Los Encargados”[Those in Charge], 2012. © Santiago Sierra and Jorge Galindo. Courtesy of Galería Helga de Alvear, Madrid

February 14 to May 18, 2014
The opening credits for the popular TV series Homeland include a montage of presidential clips, among them a close-up of President Barack Obama. At first he is shown upside down, speaking the words, “We must—” The image is quickly righted and he continues, “and we will—remain vigilant at home and abroad.” The show, while fictional, poses real questions about the powers and politics of  leadership, both seen and unseen.

More information on Black Box: Santiago Sierra and Jorge Galindo can be found at hirshhorn.si.edu.

Top: Still from Santiago Sierra and Jorge Galindo’s “Los Encargados”[Those in Charge], 2012. © Santiago Sierra and Jorge Galindo. Courtesy of Galería Helga de Alvear, Madrid

Posted on Wednesday, January 29th 2014

Tags Smithsonian Hirshhorn Black Box Santiago Sierra Jorge Galindo

Internationally recognized artist Jenny Marketou, Washington DC–based artists Patrick McDonough and Jeff Spaulding, and artist and editor Sharon Louden discuss the issues behind Living and Sustaining a Creative Life: Essays by 40 Working Artists, a new book examining how artists juggle their creative lives with the everyday needs of making a living.

Browse through the Hirshhorn’s selection of lectures and talks including Friday Gallery Talks, Meet the Artists, and Exhibition Walk-throughs at hirshhorn.si.edu.

Posted on Wednesday, January 29th 2014

Tags Smithsonian Hirshhorn In Conversation Jenny Marketou Patrick McDonough Jeff Spaulding Sharon Louden

February 7 to August 31, 2014Beautifully shot footage highlights birds of prey, landing and on the wing. The giant claw of a scrapyard crane lifts a Range Rover into a car crusher. Kids and adults frolic in the artist’s moon-bounce version of Stonehenge. Marchers in Angry Birds costumes parade in London’s Lord Mayor’s Show, waving to the crowds. Accompanying the proceedings are the tintinnabulations of the Melodians Steel Orchestra, ringing out selections by Ralph Vaughan Williams, David Bowie, and A Guy Called Gerald.
More information on Directions: Jeremy Deller can be found at hirshhorn.si.edu.
Top: Still from Jeremy Deller’s “English Magic,” 2012. © Jeremy Deller. Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise

February 7 to August 31, 2014
Beautifully shot footage highlights birds of prey, landing and on the wing. The giant claw of a scrapyard crane lifts a Range Rover into a car crusher. Kids and adults frolic in the artist’s moon-bounce version of Stonehenge. Marchers in Angry Birds costumes parade in London’s Lord Mayor’s Show, waving to the crowds. Accompanying the proceedings are the tintinnabulations of the Melodians Steel Orchestra, ringing out selections by Ralph Vaughan Williams, David Bowie, and A Guy Called Gerald.

More information on Directions: Jeremy Deller can be found at hirshhorn.si.edu.

Top: Still from Jeremy Deller’s “English Magic,” 2012. © Jeremy Deller. Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise

Posted on Wednesday, January 29th 2014

Tags Smithsonian Hirshhorn Directions Jeremy Deller

February 7 to June 15, 2014Gravity’s Edge presents paintings, sculptures, and works on paper made between 1959 and 1978 that signal a postwar shift in approaches to abstraction. The installation, drawn from the Hirshhorn’s collection, traces a double trajectory: the exploration of the force of gravity as a determining factor in artistic production and the increasing attention paid to the edge as a compelling aspect of the structure and perception of an artwork.
More information on Gravity’s Edge can be found at hirshhorn.si.edu
Top: Lynda Benglis, “Corner Piece,” 1969. © Lynda Benglis/Licensed by VAGA, New York. Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC

February 7 to June 15, 2014
Gravity’s Edge presents paintings, sculptures, and works on paper made between 1959 and 1978 that signal a postwar shift in approaches to abstraction. The installation, drawn from the Hirshhorn’s collection, traces a double trajectory: the exploration of the force of gravity as a determining factor in artistic production and the increasing attention paid to the edge as a compelling aspect of the structure and perception of an artwork.

More information on Gravity’s Edge can be found at hirshhorn.si.edu

Top: Lynda Benglis, “Corner Piece,” 1969. © Lynda Benglis/Licensed by VAGA, New York. Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC

Posted on Wednesday, January 29th 2014

Tags Smithsonian Hirshhorn Gravitys Edge Lynda Benglis